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Quincy, MA 02169
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Cat Bathing & Hygiene


This collection of Cat Bathing & Hygiene articles has been curated for you by Willard Veterinary clinic. If you would like to talk to a veterinarian, please give us a call at (617) 767-0294.

5 Grooming Tips for New Cat Owners

You might think that since your cat spends approximately half her waking hours grooming herself, she doesn’t need your help. But she does!

After all, while kitties are excellent at cleaning their exterior, they could use your help with the interior. Plus, they can't trim their nails or teeth very easily on their own. 


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Does Your Cat Have a Skin Condition?

How do you know if your cat has a skin condition? Well, two common symptoms are massive hair loss and scratching like she’s entered herself in a World Scratch-a-thon and is determined to win.

There are other symptoms too, depending on this issue and we’ll look at those in a minute.

But first, you might ask yourself, what could trigger an all out Scratch-a-thon in my cat and your answer could be fleas. Food Allergies. Even cancer could drive your cat to the brink of compulsive chewing, biting, and scratching.


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Problems in the Litter Box

Feline urethral obstruction and lower urinary disease are common conditions we see in our feline patients. Luckily, these illnesses are very treatable and preventable.


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Can Your Pet Make You Sick?

We know that pets are more than just companion animals—they are family. We let them sleep in our beds, share our meals from time to time, and lick our faces clean. But love isn’t the only thing going on between people and pets. Humans can contract many illnesses—called zoonotic diseases—from animals, even our furry family members. Thankfully, simple precautions like education, good hygiene, and appropriate veterinary care can greatly reduce your risk.


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How to Handle Hairballs

Cats are typically fastidious groomers and therefore ingest a significant amount of hair. Hair is undigestible and usually sits in the stomach until enough hair is accumulated to produce a signal that induces vomiting. Even though people often say their cat is “coughing up a hairball,” this is not the correct terminology. The hair is coming from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, not the respiratory tract (lungs).


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